Autotune Effect Logic Pro X

Best free plugin for Auto-tune? Logic Pro X is the one being used. Checking into some but curious what the most recommended one is. Save hide report. Get One Of The Best Pro Tools Instrument Plug-ins Xpand!2 For Studio One Free - Normally $69.99 Free Plug-in Of The Week - U-he Protoverb New Free Snapshot Plug-in Offers Hardware Lovers The Chance To Store Settings In Studio One.

Logic Pro X Autotune Plugin Free

The vocoder can be heard on many hit records by artists like ELO, Kraftwerk and Daft Punk. In this comprehensive tutorial, Joe Albano, shows how to create your own vocoder effects in Logic Pro X.

So here’s how to Auto Tune your vocals in Logic Pro X (For Free): The principles that I’m going to teach you are applicable to all pitch correction software e.g Melodyne, Autotune etc. The most common mistake I see people making with Auto Tune or pitch correction is that they select the plug-in and think the work is done without changing. Tutorial – Using Auto-Tune Pro in Logic Pro X – Production Expert. Antares has recently come out with a fantastic upgrade to their flagship pitch correction plug-in, Auto-Tune. The new Auto-Tune Pro has a completely redesigned interface, making it easier and more intuitive to use than ever. Logic X’s Flex Pitch is a fantastic asset to us all, and it’s free of course. Logic has been good enough to include a Vocoder in its collection of effect plug-ins—the EVOC 20 (the E comes from the old days (Emagic) and the 20 is the maximum number of frequency bands—see below). In fact, Logic has not one, but three versions of this effect—two audio processors and an Instrument, which incorporates its own synthesizer.

The Vocoder has been around for a long time—originally developed in the 1930s (!), and used for voice synthesis and even encryption (in WWII), it was adapted for musical use (by Bob Moog, among others) in the ’60s and ’70s, where its range of effects was heard on recordings by artists like Kraftwerk, Wendy Carlos (the Clockwork Orange score), ELO (“Mr Blue Sky”), Styx (“Mr Roboto”), and even Doctor Who (at least one version of the theme music). More recently, Vocoder effects have been incorporated into music by various artists, ranging from Coldplay to Daft Punk.

Vocoders are capable of quite a number of effects, from harsh, metallic Robot Voices (Cylons), to a quantized pitch effect similar to the Auto-Tune effect. But the classic Vocoder synthetic voice effect is the “singing instrument” or “singing synthesizer”. This is where a vocal is superimposed on an instrument, so it sounds like the instrument is singing—some classic examples of this particular effect are ELO’s “Mr. Blue Sky” (middle and end), and The Cars’ “Dangerous Type” (at the very end).

How Vocoders Work

The effect requires two signals—the instrument or synthesizer, which provides the tone and music—chords and/or melody—and the vocal, which articulates the words. The vocal doesn’t have to be sung (though it can be)—even a spoken word recording is fine—the pitches come from the instrument or synth. Here’s an example:

Fig 1 Logic’s EVOC 20 Vocoder processes a spoken word vocal recording

Audio Example 1 A spoken word vocal recording is used to create the classic “singing synthesizer” effect with Logic’s EVOC 20 Vocoder plug-in:

The EVOC 20

Logic has been good enough to include a Vocoder in its collection of effect plug-ins—the EVOC 20 (the E comes from the old days (Emagic) and the 20 is the maximum number of frequency bands—see below). In fact, Logic has not one, but three versions of this effect—two audio processors and an Instrument, which incorporates its own synthesizer.

These are fairly deep, complex processors, so I’m not going to explain them in full detail (that would be more of a book then an article!). For this article, I’m just going to show how to get that one classic “singing synth” effect, so I’ll cover a little of the basic theory and only the most key settings.

Of the three versions of the EVOC 20, two can be used for the classic effect we’ll be looking at here—the EVOC 20 PolySynth (the Instrument) and the EVOC 20 TrackOscillator (audio processor). Both can take a vocal and superimpose it on music—the PolySynth version uses its own synthesizer to provide the music (chords/melody), while the TrackOscillator version lets you apply Vocoding to an existing Instrument track (I used an organ in my example).

Filter this

Fig 2 The EVOC 20 Vocoder—the PolySynth (Instrument) version

The term Vocoder is short for VOice EnCODER. It encodes the characteristics of the voice using a bank of narrow-band filters—the EVOC lets you choose anywhere from 5 to 20. Looking at the EVOC 20 front panel (Fig 2) , you’ll see these in the center—more filters means a cleaner effect, fewer, a more pronounced artificial quality (somewhere in the middle (8–10–12) is a good choice). There are actually two filter banks—the Analysis and Synthesis banks.

The Vocoder works by breaking up an analysis signal (the voice, in these examples, but it could be anything) into narrow frequency bands; the included Synthesizer is broken up into the same, corresponding bands. Each of the analysis bands is coupled to its own Envelope Follower, which controls the envelope of the corresponding Synthesizer band. This superimposes the shape of the analysis wave—the vocal—onto whatever the synthesizer is playing (chords, melody).

So why does this make it sound like the Synthesizer is singing? Well, a human voice produces a number of resonant peaks called Formants—several of these combine to create the different vowel sounds. As we speak or sing, we’re changing the formants, each of which occupies a narrow frequency band, as we change vowels—that’s how we form words. The Vocoder captures the changing envelopes of these Formants with its narrow Frequency bands, and the Envelope Followers apply those envelopes to the synth sound, making the synth, in effect, produce vowels, as if it were speaking the words of the vocal signal. Since the synth is holding notes and chords, it appears to be singing those words—and there it is, the “singing synth”.

The consonants in the vocal (analysis) signal are detected and passed through, or used to generate a separate noise signal—this lends greater clarity and articulation to the “singing synth”. All of these aspects can be tweaked with the various controls in the EVOC, giving you the option to push the effect either toward clarity or away, towards a more synthetic or edgy quality.

Logic Pro X Plugins Free

Welcome to the EVOC PolySynth

Here’s how to get the classic effect with the EVOC 20 PolySynth. You’d insert one on an Instrument track, and you’ll need a second track, with a vocal recording (spoken or sung) to provide the words/syllables. The vocal track will be routed to the EVOC’s Sidechain input, using the standard Logic plug-in sidechain menu, in the upper right (Fig 3 A).

Fig 3 Setting up the EVOC 20 PolySynth for the classic Vocoder effect

There’s an Attack and Release control that determines the response to this signal—for the most intelligible vocal effect, set the fastest Attack that sounds clean (Fig 3 B). Just below right, choose the number of bands (Fig 3 C)—as I mentioned, more bands = cleaner, fewer bands = more pronounced effect (Audio Example 2).

Audio Example 2 The same signal, first with 20 bands, then 12, then 8:

Below the graph are the Formant Stretch and Formant Shift controls (Fig 3 D). These will alter the corresponding Synth Formants only, providing familiar tonal-shifting special effects (Audio Example 3). The Resonance control, to the right, can also be used to intensify the effect.

Audio Example 3 A Vocoded signal, with the Formant Stretch knob narrowed, then gradually widened; then the Formant Shift knob shifted down, then gradually shifted up:

Seafoam trans tune advance auto. Above the graph, you can set the overall bandwidth (Fig 3 E)—narrower bandwidths will also have a more pronounced synth-y effect (Audio Example 4).

Audio Example 4 The same signal, first with a wider bandwidth (150-6400 Hz), then a narrower one (300-3200 Hz):

To the left are the Synth controls (Fig 3 F), where you can dial up anything from an analog to an FM-type synth sound. These are your standard synth controls, so I won’t go over them here.

To the right, there’s a section labelled U/V Detection (Fig 3 G). U/V stands for “un-voiced”. These are the un-pitched portions of speech—the consonants. EVOC can detect these, and it will either pass them through, or generate a noise sound for them (or a blend of both), before passing the voiced components (the vowels/Formants) over to the analysis filter bank. The Sensitivity knob determines the response to the un-voiced components—too low, and the effect will lack clarity and intelligibility. The default setting (40%) is a good starting point (Audio Example 5).

Audio Example 5 The vocoded signal, first with the U/V Detection Sensitivity and Level settings at zero; then at their defaults (40% and 30%, respectively):

The Output section adds a Chorus option, and the Stereo Width knob can create either a mono effect (all the way down), or a stereo effect, by panning the different bands between left and right—centered, the bands ascend from left to right, at maximum, they alternate left and right (this control’s been at maximum for all the audio examples).

Vocode Your Own

Autotune Plugin Logic

Autotune Plugin Logic Pro X

Besides generating the classic Vocoder effect with the EVOC 20 PolySynth’s built-in synthesizer, you can also apply it to another Instrument. To do this, you’d turn to the EVOC 20 TrackOscillator audio plug-in instead. Simply insert it in any slot in the Instrument track of your choice—I’ve picked an organ track.

Fig 4 The EVOC 20 TrackOscillator lets you Vocode the Instrument of your choice

Pro Tools Autotune Plugin Free

As you can see (Fig 4), the key controls are mostly the same. If you wanted to preserve more of the Instrument’s natural sound, you could set a wider bandwidth, and more neutral Formant settings.

Audio Example 6 The EVOC 20 TrackOscillator creates a “singing organ”:

Cooking fever hack apk download android. Obviously, there are a lot more controls in these plug-ins, and a lot more effects on tap as well, but this is all we have room for now. If you’ve got Logic, and you’ve never bothered to play around much with the EVOC 20, there’s a wealth of cool effects waiting in there for you to discover!

Learn more about how to use the vocoder in Logic Pro X with this excellent video course by David Earl HERE.

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Hailed at its introduction as a 'holy grail of recording,' by Recording magazine (and adopted worldwide as the largest-selling audio plug-in of all time), Auto-Tune corrects intonation and timing problems in vocals or solo instruments, without distortion or artifacts, while preserving all of the expressive nuance of the original performance - with audio quality so pristine that the only difference between what goes in and what comes out is the intonation and timing. All with a user-interface that is a model of clarity, speed and ease-of-use.
And now, with its new-from-the-ground-up time manipulation capabilities, Auto-Tune 7 represents the most substantial advancement in functionality since Auto-Tune's original introduction in 1997.
For most common pitch problems, Auto-Tune 7's Automatic Mode instantaneously detects the pitch of the input, identifies the closest pitch in a user-specified scale (including minor, major, chromatic and 26 historical and microtonal scales), and corrects the input pitch to match the scale pitch. A Retune Speed control lets you match the retune rate to virtually any performance style as well as create the iconic Auto-Tune Vocal Effect.
For meticulous pitch and time editing, Auto-Tune 7's Graphical Mode displays the performance's detected pitch envelope and allows you to modify pitch and timing with a variety of easy-to-use graphics tools. This mode gives complete control over the correction or modification of the most elaborate pitch and rhythmic gestures.
Auto-Tune is used daily by thousands of audio professionals around the world. Whether to save studio and editing time, ease the frustration of endless retakes, save that otherwise once-in-a-lifetime performance, or create the Auto-Tune Vocal Effect, Auto-Tune is the overwhelming tool of choice.

Autotune is the perfect example of a signal processing method that can be used in overdrive as an effect or used properly in a transparent way to improve a performance. More artists than you'd realize use this tool undetectably, while others make it very obvious.

Learn more about Auto-Tune, the music industry standard for pitch correction and vocal effects. Shop and learn about the best plug-ins for pitch correction, vocal effects, voice processing, and noise reduction. Auto-Tune Pro, Auto-Tune Artist, Auto-Tune EFX+, Auto-Tune Access, Harmony Engine, Mic Mod and more. Faheem Rasheed Najm (born September 30, 1985), better known by his stage name T-Pain, is an American rapper, singer, songwriter, record producer and streamer.His debut album, Rappa Ternt Sanga, was released in 2005.In 2007, T-Pain released his second album, Epiphany, which reached number one on the US Billboard 200 chart. His third album, Thr33 Ringz, was released in 2008. Logic Pro X Tutorial – AutoTune. Mitchel Pigsley. How to get auto-tuned vocals with the LPX Flex-Pitch tool and the Pitch Correction plugin. Thanks for watching! Support: this video I explain how to achieve the auto-tune effect on vocals. For this technique I use the flex-pitch fe. Why Should you use Autotune? Autotune is a pitch correction software that corrects the pitch/tune of the vocalist’s voice to perfection. It is a device or software to tune something automatically, like a piece of computer software that would help you use the correct. Ion of an out-of-tune vocal performance.

Is There Autotune On Logic Pro X

Take artists like Cher or T-Pain, or even Lil Wayne when rapping, who nearly sound like robots during their songs. It's my opinion that the 2010 decade will be considered a 'dark age' of music, partially due to this effect that many artists will come to regret in the future.

Then you consider all of the artists you think aren't using it. Let me tell you, they all are, but their mixing engineers are doing such a fantastic job with it you wouldn't know. The main contributing factor to an 'invisible' autotune is a great vocal performance.

In order to push the effect into overdrive you have to purposefully have a bad performance to a certain degree, which is why it works so naturally well for rap artists in terms of singing to the correct pitch.

There are three levels of autotune, as far as I see it:

  1. Purposefully too much - like Cher, T-Pain, and Lil Wayne
  2. Too much needed - modern Pop and Country music
  3. The perfect amount - every other genre that you don't notice it in

The only difference between the second and third stage is how good of a vocalist the artist is. Most pop artists are selected based on their overall marketability (looks, ability to perform, above average vocal talent) as opposed to being chosen based on a supreme skill in singing.

I'm going to show you how to achieve all three stages, from sounding like a robot, to sounding like a synthesizer, to undetectable perfection.

What is Autotune?

Autotune is an audio signal processor tool originally used to correct off-key pitches in vocal performances (or any other instrument). It's also used as a sound effect applies pitch correction so aggressively that it sounds unnatural and synthetic.

The term Autotune has become synonymous with pitch correction, but it's actually a trademarked word and tool created by Antares Audio Technologies. Many DAW plugins exist that all have their own names and are referred to as such, but the effect is now commonly and simply called 'autotune.'

While disguising off-key pitches by slightly adjusting them to lock on key was the initial intention, Cher changed pop music for every with her 1998 single Believe. It uses the effect over-dramatically and inspired musicians like T-Pain to make it their signature sound.

How to Autotune

In this section I'll be telling you exactly how to use autotune, but I'll do it from the perspective of polishing an already great vocal performance. The key to having a transparent and musical use of this plugin is to create as best of a vocal track as possible.

This usually means singing the same section of a song dozens of times and creating a 'best of' composite track. Only after the absolute best performance has been pieced together from many takes should you fix the final errors with pitch correction software.

Note: Any vocal recording or instrument you want to use pitch correction on must be a mono track. Stereo tracks don't work out. It also needs to be free of reverb, delay, and other audio effects.

1) Apply the Plugin to the Track & Familiarize Yourself With It

I have to assume you know how to use your digital audio workstation software and how to add a plugin to a track in the multitrack. What I can't assume is which plugin you'll be using. In this case I'll be showing you the Logic Pro Pitch Correction plugin. They all work the same but look different.

Though I'll show you Logic Pro's default plugin, I'm going to use terminology that's more likely to appear in all of the plugins. You'll be able to figure out what's what, since I give several names for each parameter you can adjust.

If you aren't familiar with the settings at all, please scroll down to the next main section of the article called Autotune Settings. I define each setting and also provide some suggested starting points for the three levels of pitch correction mentioned above.

2) Select the Key, Scale, & Input Type

You'll typically have two choices. You can manually select a key (like G Minor) and a scale (Melodic minor scale), or you can punch it in manually on the provided keyboard. Sometimes, instead of a key they'll ask you for the root note of your scale, which would be G if using G Minor or G Major.

If you choose a key and scale from the list, you'll still want to adjust which notes are available as targets for tuning on the keyboard. Sometimes vocals doen't use all of the notes in a scale and you don't want them available, especially if a performance is extra 'not good.'

Alternatively, if you're going for the goofy robot rap vocal sound then choose the chromatic scale, which means all possible notes are available as pitch correction targets.

3) Choose Your Retune Speed

Now that you've defined the allowable notes for the effect, it's time to make it actually work. We're now going to focus on the retune knob or slider. A slower speed, like 400 ms to half of a second, will be completely undetectable but entirely too slow to even do anything in most cases.

Loop the vocals in solo mode (so you can only hear the singer) and start the retune at the slowest amount allowed. Slowly increase it and you'll begin to see the meter show which note is being detected and how sharp or flat it is in cents. That amount is how much pitch correction needs to be applied.

The retune speed defines how quickly it applies that amount of pitch correction. So if you need to slide a note up by 50 cents, that can occur instantaneously at zero milliseconds, or over 100 ms, as examples. You'll have to choose the right amount that provides the sound you want.

For electronic music, you may want it to be slightly noticeable. For the robot effect set it to zero. For a transparent use of the effect, you'll have to toy with it, but it'll be a slower setting than faster. It's impossible to tell you what the right amount is. You have to use your ears!

4) Decide How Perfect You Want the Vocals to Be

Regardless how quickly you're 'snapping' to the correct pitch, you have more choices to make about how impeccable and perfect you want the vocals to be. No human can hold a perfect note. Even the best will waver by a few cents. If you remove that wavering, it will sound unreal.

If you want to add the human element back into the vocal track, use the Flex Tune option if it's available. Logic Pro's Pitch Correction has no such option. It allows the vocals to be off-pitch by the amount you define, basically telling the processor to not change the pitch if it's 'close enough.' A small amount of this can bring your track back down to reality.

Now focus on the Humanize knob if you have it or something similar. It tells the plugin to hold to a specific note if the vocals start to waver too far, rather than correcting to a different, unintended note. Think of it like a release on a compressor. Use this when your singer holds onto notes for a long time at the end of phrases.

Natural Vibrato is another option that's not always available. It detects when the vocalist is using purposeful vibrato and allows you to increase or decrease the intensity of it. In my opinion, I wouldn't bother using this. This is a choice that needs to be made while recording the vocals.

5) Unsolo the Vocals & Tweak in Context of the Full Mix

Auto Tune Pro Download

This is your last step. You want to unsolo your vocals so you hear the backing tracks, too. Now listen to your work in the context of the full mix. From here, the only thing you'll likely want to tweak is the retune speed.

For electronic-based music like dubstep or EDM, you may even want a slight robotic sound. For classical, jazz, rock, or pop, which are more organic sounding genres, you'll want it to be less noticeable, so you'd choose a slower retune speed.

From here, your vocal's pitches may sound great, but you may still have other issues with the tracks. Check out our article on how to mix vocals to get a walkthrough that will revolutionize your quality. You'll want to apply those principals on every vocal track, every time.

Autotune Settings

Now I want to do two things. I want to define what each of the settings on your plugin does, and I want to provide some starting settings where possible that match each of the three styles of pitch correction I mentioned before.

Pitch Correction Options

Each pitch correction plugin with have various parameters (knobs) you can adjust. For the most part you'll be confronted with five options:

  • Key, Scale, & Input Type
  • Retune Speed (Response Time)
  • Flex Tune (Smoothness)
  • Humanize (Release Time)
  • Natural Vibrato (Vibrato Adjustment)

These are what they're called on the official Autotune plugin and are (typically) what you'll find on the other ones, even if they're renamed to a degree.

Key, Scale, & Input Type - Without telling the software which key and type of scale you're using, it won't know which pitches to adjust towards. You can choose these from a selectable list (like major scale, harmonic minor scale, etc.) or punch it in yourself on the available keyboard layout.

Autotune

The input type will vary in complexity from simply offering the two choices of Normal (higher vocal registers) or Low (Bass and Baritone). Some will actually let you choose from terms like Soprano, Tenor, Alto, etc. This just helps the software expect certain octaves so it can process faster and more accurately.

Retune Speed (Response Time) - This is measured in milliseconds and will let you go to zero, meaning instantaneous (how you get the robot sound). This speed controls how quickly a bad note is retuned to the correct one. If you set it too fast it will sound obvious and come with glitches as well.

Most of the time you will want subtlety, so you'll use a slower value so that the listener doesn't detect the changes. This is how you'll achieve a natural sound, while the faster times will begin to sound 'too good,' and if the performance is bad enough it will sound unnatural.

Flex Tune (Smoothness) - This kind of option isn't always available. Think of this option as adding smoothness to a processed track that required a faster retune speed due to how off pitch the vocalist was. It tries to smooth out the transitions and make them sound more gentle and less detectable.

You may think this would fight against the retuning but it's more like adding an allowable margin of error. It basically lets you decide that if a note is close enough to the correct pitch, to leave it alone and not process it. It helps you maintain the human element to the track rather than making it unnaturally perfect.

Humanize (Release Time) - I like to think of this as a release time (similar to what you find on a compressor). It tells the pitch correction to hold fast during long notes. If your vocalist doesn't hold out long, sustained notes at the end of phrases you may not need this.

What it's for is to correct unintentional vibrato during long notes. When the singer's voice wavers by accident, it won't be 'pitch perfect' like purposeful vibrato is. If the note wavers too far it'll snap to a different note. This option keeps that from happening.

Natural Vibrato (Vibrato Adjustment) - You won't always find this option either. It's kind of the opposite of the Humanize option above in that it can introduce vibrato that is otherwise missing. It takes talent to sing vibrato and to do it correctly. If your singer can't do it but the song calls for it, this option can add it in at varying amounts. It can also reduce the intensity of the natural vibrato.

Autotune Settings for Singing

Above I mentioned the three levels of pitch correction, which are basically 'complete overkill,' 'too much is needed,' and 'perfect and unnoticeable.' Here are some starting points to you can use, but please note that you'll have to adjust them to taste for each and every vocal track. What's needed will change each time!

For a purposefully over-dramatic use of the effect like Cher or T-Pain, set the retune speed and flex tune speeds to zero. This will snap the notes instantaneously to the pitches they should be at. Set the humanize knob to the maximum and reduce natural vibrato as much as you can.

This will cause the vocals to sound like a synthesizer. You can make it even more dramatic by purposefully singing off pitch when recording. You should be close but nowhere near perfect in order to make the plugin really put in the work to re-pitch each note.

For the current expectation for pop and country music, try setting the retune speed around 5 ms to 15 ms, with barely any flex tune. A little bit is good to keep the track sounding realistic. What you'll end up with is a pitch-perfect track but one that doesn't 'snap' quickly to the notes so it still sounds like a human performance.

For natural, realistic sounding autotune, you'll want a slower retune speed (set it to where you barely hear it and then back it off a bit more) and maybe 10% flex tune to allow some wavering. That's it. Leave the other settings alone.

Pro-Tip: You can add pitch correction to only parts of a performance if you don't want to use it much but certain parts definitely need fixing. Add the plugin to an automation track with a very slow retune speed, then on the parts you want to fix, crank up the retune speed so it actually acts on the vocals quickly enough to correct the pitch.

The Differences Between Autotune Plugins

I mentioned there being a lot of pitch correction plugins, which may have left with the questions of which is the best and what are the differences. They all do the exact same job, though some have more options, while one has an unbelievable amount of extra choices.

Heres a list of some of the most popular pitch correction plugin choices:

  • Celemony Melodyne
  • Antares Auto-Tune (various versions)
  • Wave Tune (various versions)
  • Zynaptiq Pitchmap
  • Melda MAutoPitch
  • Synchro Arts Revoice Pro
  • Izotope Nectar
  • Logic Pro Pitch Correction
  • Steinberg PitchCorrect
  • Cakewalk/Roland V-Vocal
  • Mu Technologies Mu Voice

There's a lot more, but those are your most popular choices in no particular order other than Antares Auto-Tune being the most popular. Celemony Melodyne is another great but costly choice that provides some unbelievable choices, especially with the visual user interface. Look at this thing:

The differences here are that the paid versions will have more choices, and as you move into the 'Pro' versions of each one they'll introduce more options for you. Many users will find they don't need the most advanced choices, especially when not adding pitch correction in real time.

Pro-Tip: Melodyne is very transparent. You can correct the pitches and tweak the cents very close to perfect and bounce the track. From there you can then apply Autotune to the 'almost perfect' track and end up with a godly vocal performance that sounds very natural.

That's How to Use Autotune!

The process is very simple. The challenge is understanding what each setting does, because the short names can't possibly be self-explanatory due to the complexity of the software. Once you understand what the knobs do, the rest is a piece of cake.

With our walkthrough and explanations above, you should have know how to use autotune as well as any professional. Finding the correct settings is as simple as slowly turning the knobs and using your ears. It's truly a revolutionary plugin, not only in its power but in its simplicity.

Autotune is the perfect example of a signal processing method that can be used in overdrive as an effect or used properly in a transparent way to improve a performance. More artists than you'd realize use this tool undetectably, while others make it very obvious.

Take artists like Cher or T-Pain, or even Lil Wayne when rapping, who nearly sound like robots during their songs. It's my opinion that the 2010 decade will be considered a 'dark age' of music, partially due to this effect that many artists will come to regret in the future.

Then you consider all of the artists you think aren't using it. Let me tell you, they all are, but their mixing engineers are doing such a fantastic job with it you wouldn't know. The main contributing factor to an 'invisible' autotune is a great vocal performance.

In order to push the effect into overdrive you have to purposefully have a bad performance to a certain degree, which is why it works so naturally well for rap artists in terms of singing to the correct pitch.

There are three levels of autotune, as far as I see it:

  1. Purposefully too much - like Cher, T-Pain, and Lil Wayne
  2. Too much needed - modern Pop and Country music
  3. The perfect amount - every other genre that you don't notice it in

The only difference between the second and third stage is how good of a vocalist the artist is. Most pop artists are selected based on their overall marketability (looks, ability to perform, above average vocal talent) as opposed to being chosen based on a supreme skill in singing.

I'm going to show you how to achieve all three stages, from sounding like a robot, to sounding like a synthesizer, to undetectable perfection.

What is Autotune?

Autotune is an audio signal processor tool originally used to correct off-key pitches in vocal performances (or any other instrument). It's also used as a sound effect applies pitch correction so aggressively that it sounds unnatural and synthetic.

The term Autotune has become synonymous with pitch correction, but it's actually a trademarked word and tool created by Antares Audio Technologies. Many DAW plugins exist that all have their own names and are referred to as such, but the effect is now commonly and simply called 'autotune.'

While disguising off-key pitches by slightly adjusting them to lock on key was the initial intention, Cher changed pop music for every with her 1998 single Believe. It uses the effect over-dramatically and inspired musicians like T-Pain to make it their signature sound.

How to Autotune

In this section I'll be telling you exactly how to use autotune, but I'll do it from the perspective of polishing an already great vocal performance. The key to having a transparent and musical use of this plugin is to create as best of a vocal track as possible.

This usually means singing the same section of a song dozens of times and creating a 'best of' composite track. Only after the absolute best performance has been pieced together from many takes should you fix the final errors with pitch correction software.

Note: Any vocal recording or instrument you want to use pitch correction on must be a mono track. Stereo tracks don't work out. It also needs to be free of reverb, delay, and other audio effects.

1) Apply the Plugin to the Track & Familiarize Yourself With It

I have to assume you know how to use your digital audio workstation software and how to add a plugin to a track in the multitrack. What I can't assume is which plugin you'll be using. In this case I'll be showing you the Logic Pro Pitch Correction plugin. They all work the same but look different.

Though I'll show you Logic Pro's default plugin, I'm going to use terminology that's more likely to appear in all of the plugins. You'll be able to figure out what's what, since I give several names for each parameter you can adjust.

If you aren't familiar with the settings at all, please scroll down to the next main section of the article called Autotune Settings. I define each setting and also provide some suggested starting points for the three levels of pitch correction mentioned above.

2) Select the Key, Scale, & Input Type

You'll typically have two choices. You can manually select a key (like G Minor) and a scale (Melodic minor scale), or you can punch it in manually on the provided keyboard. Sometimes, instead of a key they'll ask you for the root note of your scale, which would be G if using G Minor or G Major.

If you choose a key and scale from the list, you'll still want to adjust which notes are available as targets for tuning on the keyboard. Sometimes vocals doen't use all of the notes in a scale and you don't want them available, especially if a performance is extra 'not good.'

Alternatively, if you're going for the goofy robot rap vocal sound then choose the chromatic scale, which means all possible notes are available as pitch correction targets.

3) Choose Your Retune Speed

Now that you've defined the allowable notes for the effect, it's time to make it actually work. We're now going to focus on the retune knob or slider. A slower speed, like 400 ms to half of a second, will be completely undetectable but entirely too slow to even do anything in most cases.

Loop the vocals in solo mode (so you can only hear the singer) and start the retune at the slowest amount allowed. Slowly increase it and you'll begin to see the meter show which note is being detected and how sharp or flat it is in cents. That amount is how much pitch correction needs to be applied.

The retune speed defines how quickly it applies that amount of pitch correction. So if you need to slide a note up by 50 cents, that can occur instantaneously at zero milliseconds, or over 100 ms, as examples. You'll have to choose the right amount that provides the sound you want.

For electronic music, you may want it to be slightly noticeable. For the robot effect set it to zero. For a transparent use of the effect, you'll have to toy with it, but it'll be a slower setting than faster. It's impossible to tell you what the right amount is. You have to use your ears!

4) Decide How Perfect You Want the Vocals to Be

Regardless how quickly you're 'snapping' to the correct pitch, you have more choices to make about how impeccable and perfect you want the vocals to be. No human can hold a perfect note. Even the best will waver by a few cents. If you remove that wavering, it will sound unreal.

If you want to add the human element back into the vocal track, use the Flex Tune option if it's available. Logic Pro's Pitch Correction has no such option. It allows the vocals to be off-pitch by the amount you define, basically telling the processor to not change the pitch if it's 'close enough.' A small amount of this can bring your track back down to reality.

Now focus on the Humanize knob if you have it or something similar. It tells the plugin to hold to a specific note if the vocals start to waver too far, rather than correcting to a different, unintended note. Think of it like a release on a compressor. Use this when your singer holds onto notes for a long time at the end of phrases.

Natural Vibrato is another option that's not always available. It detects when the vocalist is using purposeful vibrato and allows you to increase or decrease the intensity of it. In my opinion, I wouldn't bother using this. This is a choice that needs to be made while recording the vocals.

5) Unsolo the Vocals & Tweak in Context of the Full Mix

This is your last step. You want to unsolo your vocals so you hear the backing tracks, too. Now listen to your work in the context of the full mix. From here, the only thing you'll likely want to tweak is the retune speed.

For electronic-based music like dubstep or EDM, you may even want a slight robotic sound. For classical, jazz, rock, or pop, which are more organic sounding genres, you'll want it to be less noticeable, so you'd choose a slower retune speed.

From here, your vocal's pitches may sound great, but you may still have other issues with the tracks. Check out our article on how to mix vocals to get a walkthrough that will revolutionize your quality. You'll want to apply those principals on every vocal track, every time.

Autotune Settings

Now I want to do two things. I want to define what each of the settings on your plugin does, and I want to provide some starting settings where possible that match each of the three styles of pitch correction I mentioned before.

Autotune Effect Logic Pro X

Pitch Correction Options

Each pitch correction plugin with have various parameters (knobs) you can adjust. For the most part you'll be confronted with five options:

  • Key, Scale, & Input Type
  • Retune Speed (Response Time)
  • Flex Tune (Smoothness)
  • Humanize (Release Time)
  • Natural Vibrato (Vibrato Adjustment)

These are what they're called on the official Autotune plugin and are (typically) what you'll find on the other ones, even if they're renamed to a degree.

Key, Scale, & Input Type - Without telling the software which key and type of scale you're using, it won't know which pitches to adjust towards. You can choose these from a selectable list (like major scale, harmonic minor scale, etc.) or punch it in yourself on the available keyboard layout.

The input type will vary in complexity from simply offering the two choices of Normal (higher vocal registers) or Low (Bass and Baritone). Some will actually let you choose from terms like Soprano, Tenor, Alto, etc. This just helps the software expect certain octaves so it can process faster and more accurately.

Retune Speed (Response Time) - This is measured in milliseconds and will let you go to zero, meaning instantaneous (how you get the robot sound). This speed controls how quickly a bad note is retuned to the correct one. If you set it too fast it will sound obvious and come with glitches as well.

Most of the time you will want subtlety, so you'll use a slower value so that the listener doesn't detect the changes. This is how you'll achieve a natural sound, while the faster times will begin to sound 'too good,' and if the performance is bad enough it will sound unnatural.

Flex Tune (Smoothness) - This kind of option isn't always available. Think of this option as adding smoothness to a processed track that required a faster retune speed due to how off pitch the vocalist was. It tries to smooth out the transitions and make them sound more gentle and less detectable.

You may think this would fight against the retuning but it's more like adding an allowable margin of error. It basically lets you decide that if a note is close enough to the correct pitch, to leave it alone and not process it. It helps you maintain the human element to the track rather than making it unnaturally perfect.

Humanize (Release Time) - I like to think of this as a release time (similar to what you find on a compressor). It tells the pitch correction to hold fast during long notes. If your vocalist doesn't hold out long, sustained notes at the end of phrases you may not need this.

What it's for is to correct unintentional vibrato during long notes. When the singer's voice wavers by accident, it won't be 'pitch perfect' like purposeful vibrato is. If the note wavers too far it'll snap to a different note. This option keeps that from happening.

Natural Vibrato (Vibrato Adjustment) - You won't always find this option either. It's kind of the opposite of the Humanize option above in that it can introduce vibrato that is otherwise missing. It takes talent to sing vibrato and to do it correctly. If your singer can't do it but the song calls for it, this option can add it in at varying amounts. It can also reduce the intensity of the natural vibrato.

Autotune Settings for Singing

Above I mentioned the three levels of pitch correction, which are basically 'complete overkill,' 'too much is needed,' and 'perfect and unnoticeable.' Here are some starting points to you can use, but please note that you'll have to adjust them to taste for each and every vocal track. What's needed will change each time!

For a purposefully over-dramatic use of the effect like Cher or T-Pain, set the retune speed and flex tune speeds to zero. This will snap the notes instantaneously to the pitches they should be at. Set the humanize knob to the maximum and reduce natural vibrato as much as you can.

This will cause the vocals to sound like a synthesizer. You can make it even more dramatic by purposefully singing off pitch when recording. You should be close but nowhere near perfect in order to make the plugin really put in the work to re-pitch each note.

For the current expectation for pop and country music, try setting the retune speed around 5 ms to 15 ms, with barely any flex tune. A little bit is good to keep the track sounding realistic. What you'll end up with is a pitch-perfect track but one that doesn't 'snap' quickly to the notes so it still sounds like a human performance.

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For natural, realistic sounding autotune, you'll want a slower retune speed (set it to where you barely hear it and then back it off a bit more) and maybe 10% flex tune to allow some wavering. That's it. Leave the other settings alone.

Autotune Logic Pro X Plugin

Pro-Tip: You can add pitch correction to only parts of a performance if you don't want to use it much but certain parts definitely need fixing. Add the plugin to an automation track with a very slow retune speed, then on the parts you want to fix, crank up the retune speed so it actually acts on the vocals quickly enough to correct the pitch.

The Differences Between Autotune Plugins

I mentioned there being a lot of pitch correction plugins, which may have left with the questions of which is the best and what are the differences. They all do the exact same job, though some have more options, while one has an unbelievable amount of extra choices.

Heres a list of some of the most popular pitch correction plugin choices:

  • Celemony Melodyne
  • Antares Auto-Tune (various versions)
  • Wave Tune (various versions)
  • Zynaptiq Pitchmap
  • Melda MAutoPitch
  • Synchro Arts Revoice Pro
  • Izotope Nectar
  • Logic Pro Pitch Correction
  • Steinberg PitchCorrect
  • Cakewalk/Roland V-Vocal
  • Mu Technologies Mu Voice

There's a lot more, but those are your most popular choices in no particular order other than Antares Auto-Tune being the most popular. Celemony Melodyne is another great but costly choice that provides some unbelievable choices, especially with the visual user interface. Look at this thing:

Antares

The differences here are that the paid versions will have more choices, and as you move into the 'Pro' versions of each one they'll introduce more options for you. Many users will find they don't need the most advanced choices, especially when not adding pitch correction in real time.

Autotune Logic Pro X Download

Pro-Tip:Ayur multani mitti. Melodyne is very transparent. You can correct the pitches and tweak the cents very close to perfect and bounce the track. From there you can then apply Autotune to the 'almost perfect' track and end up with a godly vocal performance that sounds very natural.

That's How to Use Autotune!

The process is very simple. The challenge is understanding what each setting does, because the short names can't possibly be self-explanatory due to the complexity of the software. Once you understand what the knobs do, the rest is a piece of cake.

With our walkthrough and explanations above, you should have know how to use autotune as well as any professional. Finding the correct settings is as simple as slowly turning the knobs and using your ears. It's truly a revolutionary plugin, not only in its power but in its simplicity.

Autotune Logic Pro Free

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