Smith And Wesson Model 41 Serial Numbers

Smith

Funny thing about guns. They're a lot like potato chips. You can never have just one.

  1. Sep 16, 2021 My Model 41 has a serial number in the 20,000 range.The Smith & Wesson Model Number Two Army. Process of nishing a book on the Model Two Army and I continue to.Supica's book states: 'Introduction at AAA 000x serial prefix' So yes, yours is surely from the first day 11-11.smith wesson serial numbers serial number K 307319 - Sport & Outdoor.
  2. Smith & Wesson Model 41 Serial Number Model 41 Pistol. I just bought a mod 41 ser # 141xxx it's looks new with box paper work and unopened cleaning kit and muzzle break.
  3. Smith and wesson model 41 serial number date of manufacture A serial number is a unique, identifying number or group of numbers and letters assigned to an individual piece of hardware or software. Other things have serial numbers as well, though, including banknotes and other similar documents.
  4. The Smith & Wesson Model 57 is a large frame, double-action revolver with a six round cylinder, chambered for the.41 Magnum cartridge, and designed and manufactured by the Smith & Wesson firearms company.The gun was designed as a weapon for law enforcement agencies. However, due to size and recoil it found more favor with civilian target shooters and hunters.

My Model 41 has a serial number in the 20,000 range.The Smith & Wesson Model Number Two Army. Process of nishing a book on the Model Two Army and I continue to.Supica's book states: 'Introduction at AAA 000x serial prefix' So yes, yours is surely from the first day 11-11.smith wesson serial numbers serial number K 307319 - Sport & Outdoor.

But few potato chips increase in value as they age. In fact, I would argue that older potato chips decrease quite quickly in value. And taste. Guns? They never go stale.

Some guns carry a value that can't be measured in dollars. They are the guns that are passed down from one generation to the next. And we're excited to announce a new addition to Guns and Camo: What's It Worth.

Thanks to our friends at the Blue Book of Gun Values, the authority on values of all firearms, we're going to take a weekly look at some interesting firearms and fill you in on what they're worth.

Consider this an open call to send us photos and info about a special gun in your collection. Send firearm photos and specs to [email protected] We'll select a gun or two each week, run it through Blue Book's excellent system, and share the results with you here.

To kick things off, Guns and Camo blogger Keith Wood chose a special gun from his own safe.

— Tony Hansen, Editor Realtree.com

Manufacturer: Smith & Wesson
Model: Model 41
Caliber: .22 pistol
Value: $1,007.50

My chosen firearm is a Smith & Wesson Model 41 .22 pistol. The Model 41 is the Cadillac of .22 handguns and dominated bullseye matches for decades. The Model 41 is a timeless classic handgun whose quality construction, excellent finish, and superior accuracy make it an instant heirloom. They just don’t make guns like this anymore.

My Model 41 has a serial number in the 20,000 range, which makes it a very early example (1959-1960). It has a 7 3/8-inch barrel without compensator. A pre-1978 gun, it has a cocking indicator. The gun is in overall good condition with some scratches, but no rust or pitting. Based on the standard percentage grading system, I’d rate it at 90 percent. There is a fairly large chip in the checkered walnut grip.

“Produced continuously since 1957, Smith & Wesson's iconic Model 41 .22 caliber match target pistol is as relevant and competitive today as it was nearly six decades ago,” said Adam Burt of Blue Book of Gun Value. “Collectors also like this model because of all the variations available, including different barrel lengths, sights, grips, markings, and both standard and optional features.”

Prices have really shot up on these guns lately. According to Blue Book’s site, a Model 41 in 90 percent condition is worth $775. The site tells you to add 15 to 40 percent for early versions with the cocking indicator, which my gun has. We’ll split the middle and add 30 percent, bringing the value up to $1,007.50. True price is determined by what the market will bear, but $1,000 is a good estimate. I’ve owned this gun a few years and paid far less than it's value. Doesn’t matter, though. I’ll never sell it.

SAFETY HAMMERLESS

.32 Safety Hammerless (aka .32 New Departure or .32 Lemon Squeezer) 1st Model

Push button latch serial number 1- 91417. Built 1888-1902. NOTE: Add 50 percent premium for revolvers built before 1898.

My Model 41 has a serial number in the 20,000 range,.The Smith & Wesson Model Number Two Army. Process of nishing a book on the Model Two Army and I continue to.Supica's book states: 'Introduction at AAA 000x serial prefix' So yes, yours is surely from the first day 11-11.smith wesson serial numbers serial number K 307319 - Sport & Outdoor. Model Numbers began in 1957-58. So first, look for a Model Number: IF there is a DASH Number, give us the complete model number! This is a Model 67-1 If there is NO Model number behind the yoke, there is probably NOTHING we need from back there! The assembly number which does NOT match the serial number on the butt is USELESS to us. Look up the pistol's full serial number - including all letters and numbers - in the back section of the 'Standard Catalog of Smith & Wesson' book. These listings inform you of the pistol's date of manufacture, based on the serial number. Items you will need Smith and Wesson pistol. Smith and Wesson Serial Number Date of Manufacture J Frame Revolver Lookup For models 36, 37, 38, 49, 50 and pre model number versions. 1950 = start at 1 1952 = 7369 - 21342.

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.32 Safety Hammerless 2nd Model

T-bar latch pinned front sight. Serial number 91418-169999. Built 1902 to 1909.
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.32 Safety Hammerless 3rd Model

T-bar latch integral forged front sight. Serial number 170000-242981. Built 1909 to 1937. NOTE: Add 200 percent for 2' barrel Bicycle Model.
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.38 Double-Action 1st Model

Similar in appearance to .32 1st Model. Having a straight cut side-plate but chambered for .38 S&W cartridge. Grips are checkered. Serial Range 1-about 4000. Manufactured circa 1880.
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.38 Double-Action 2nd Model

Similar in appearance to .32 2nd Model but chambered for .38 S&W cartridge. Approximately 115,000 manufactured between 1880 and 1884. Serial range about 4001-119000.
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.38 Double-Action 3rd Model

Essentially the same in appearance as .32 Model but chambered for .38 S&W cartridge. Also offered with 3.25', 4', 5', 6', 8' and 10' barrel. There were numerous internal changes in this model, similar to .32 Double-Action 3rd Model. Serial Range 119001 to 3227000. Approximately 203,700 manufactured between 1884 and 1895.

.38 Double-Action 3rd Model

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.38 Double-Action 3rd Model

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Smith And Wesson Model 41 Serial Numbers By Year Chart

.38 Double-Action 4th Model

This is .38 S&W version of 4th Model. Identical in outward appearance to 3rd Model. Relocation of sear was the main design change in this model. Serial Range 322701 to 539000. Approximately 216,300 manufactured between 1895 and 1909. NOTE: Add 20 percent premium for revolvers built before 1898.
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.38 Double-Action 5th Model

This model same as .32, except chambered for .38 S&W cartridge. Serial Range 529001 to 554077. Approximately 15,000 manufactured between 1909 and 1911.
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.38 Double-Action Perfected

Model 41 Performance Center For Sale

A unique top-break, with both a barrel latch similar to other top-breaks and thumb-piece similar to hand ejectors. Also the only top-break where triggerguard is integral to the frame, rather than a separate piece. Produced from 1909 to 1920 in their own serial number range 1-59400.

Smith And Wesson Model 41 Serial Numbers By Year

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.38 Safety Hammerless 1st Model

Z-bar latch. Serial number range 1 to 5250. Made 1887 only. NOTE: Add 50 percent for 6' barrel. RARE!
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.38 Safety Hammerless 2nd Model

Push button latch protrudes above frame. Serial number 5251-42483. Built 1887-1890.
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.38 Safety Hammerless 3rd Model

Push button latch flush with frame. Serial number 42484-116002. Built 1890-1898.
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.38 Safety Hammerless Army Test Revolver

Approximately 100 sold to U.S. government in 1890. They have 3rd Model features, but in 2nd Model serial number range 41333-41470. Fitted with 6' barrels and marked 'US'. CAUTION: Be wary of fakes. NOTE: Rarity makes valuation speculative.
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.38 Safety Hammerless 4th Model

Produced in .38 S&W only. The only difference in 4th Model and 3rd Model is adoption of standard T-bar type of barrel latch as found on most of the top-break revolvers. '.38 S&W Cartridge' was also added to the left side of barrel. Approximately 104,000 manufactured between 1898 and 1907. Serial number range 116003 to 220000.
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.38 Safety Hammerless 5th Model

Last of the 'Lemon Squeezers'. Only appreciable difference between this model and 4th Model is the front sight blade on 5th Model is an integral part of the barrel, not a separate blade pinned onto the barrel. Approximately 41,500 manufactured between 1907 and 1940. Serial number range 220001 to 261493. NOTE: Add 50 percent for 2' barrel version.
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First Model American

This model represented a number of firsts for Smith & Wesson Company. It was first of the top-break automatic ejection revolvers. Also first Smith & Wesson in a large caliber (chambered for .44 S&W American cartridge as well as .44 Henry rimfire on rare occasions). Also known as 1st Model American. This large revolver offered with an 8' round barrel with a raised rib as standard. Barrel lengths of 6' and 7' were also available. It has a 6-shot fluted cylinder and square butt with walnut grips. Blued or nickel-plated. Interesting to note, this model appeared three years before Colt's Single-Action Army and perhaps, more than any other model, was associated with the historic American West. Only 8,000 manufactured between 1870 and 1872. NOTE: Add 25 percent for 'oil hole' variation found on approximately first 1,500 guns; 50 percent for unusual barrel lengths other than standard 8'. Original 'Nashville Police' marked guns worth a substantial premium. About 200 made in .44 Henry rimfire will bring 25% to 50% premium.
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Model 3 American 1st Model

NOTE: Add 25 percent for 'oil hole' variation found on approximately first 1,500 guns; 50 percent for unusual barrel lengths other than standard 8'. Original 'Nashville Police' marked guns worth a substantial premium.
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Transitional American Model

Serial number range 6466-6744. Shorter cylinder (1.423'). Improved barrel of 2nd Model but retains the flat bottom frame of the 1st Model.
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First Model American U.S. Army Order

One thousand produced with 'U.S.' stamped on top of barrel. 'OWA' on left grip. They are scattered in the serial number range 125-2199.
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Model 3 American 1st Model

Only 200 produced throughout serial range. NOTE: Rarity makes valuation speculative.
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Second Model American

Courtesy Buffalo Bill Historical Center, Cody, Wyoming
An improved version of 1st Model. Most notable difference is larger diameter trigger pivot pin and frame protrusions above trigger to accommodate it. Front sight blade on this model is made of steel instead of nickel silver. Several internal improvements were also incorporated into this model. This model commonly known as American 2nd Model. The 8' barrel length was standard. Approximately 20,735 manufactured between 1872 and 1874. NOTE: There have been 5.5', 6', 6.5' and 7' barrels noted; but they are extremely scarce and would bring a 40 percent premium over standard 8' model. Use caution when purchasing these short barrel revolvers. Approximately 3,014 chambered for .44 Henry rimfire with large triangular flat-tip firing pin, may bring 10% to 25% premium.
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Model 3 American 2nd Model

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Model 3 American 2nd Model

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First Model Russian (Old Model)

Configuration is about identical to American 2nd Model. S&W made several internal changes to this model to satisfy the Russian government. Markings on this revolver are distinct. Caliber for which it is chambered, .44 S&W Russian, is different from the 2nd Model Russian. Approximately 20,000 Russian-Contract revolvers. Serial number range 1-20000. They are marked in Russian Cyrillic letters. Russian double-headed eagle stamped on rear portion of barrel, with inspector's marks underneath it. All contract guns have 8' barrels and lanyard swivels on the butt. These are rarely encountered, as most were shipped to Russia. Commercial run of this model numbered approximately 4,655. Barrels are stamped in English and include the words 'Russian Model'. Some are found with 6' and 7' barrels, as well as standard 8'. There were also 500 revolvers that were rejected from the Russian contract series and sold on the commercial market. Some of these are marked in English; some, Cyrillic. Some have the Cyrillic markings ground off and English restamped. Manufactured from 1871 to 1874. Guns with Cyrillic barrel markings may bring up to 25% premium.
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Model 3 Russian 1st Model

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Model 3 Russian 1st Model

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Model 3 Russian 1st Model

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Second Model Russian (Old Model)

This revolver was known as 'Old Model Russian'. This is a complicated model to understand as there are many variations within the model designation. Serial numbering is quite complex as well and values vary due to relatively minor model differences. Before purchasing this model, it would be advisable to read reference materials solely devoted to this firearm. Chambered for .44 S&W Russian, with some scarce variations in .44 Henry rimfire cartridge. It has a 7' barrel and a round butt featuring a projection on the frame that fits into the thumb web. Grips are walnut and finish blue or nickel-plated. Triggerguard has a reverse curved spur on the bottom. Approximately 85,200 manufactured between 1873 and 1878. Variations include:Russian Contract Cyrillic marked – 10% premium, Japanese Navy, anchor with 2 wavy lines marked – 10% premium, .44 Henry Rimfire variations. Flat tipped triangular firing pin, Commercial - 500 made – 25% premium, 1st Turkish Contract, s/n range 1-1000 – 25-50% premium, 2nd Turkish Contract in standard s/n range – 25% premium
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Model 3 Russian 2nd Model

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Model 3 Russian 2nd Model

500 made.
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Model 3 Russian 2nd Model

70,000 made; rare, as most were shipped to Russia. Cyrillic markings; lanyard swivel on butt.
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Model 3 Russian 2nd Model

.44 rimfire Henry, special rimfire frames, serial-numbered in own serial number range 1-1000.
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Model 3 Russian 2nd Model

Made from altered centerfire frames from regular commercial serial number range. 1,000 made. Use caution with this model.
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Model 3 Russian 2nd Model

Five thousand made between 1-9000 serial number range. Japanese naval insignia, an anchor over two wavy lines, found on butt. Barrel is Japanese proofed and words 'Jan.19, 75 REISSUE July 25, 1871' are stamped on barrel, as well.
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Third Model Russian (New Model)

Model 3 Russian 3rd ModelThis revolver is also known as 'New Model Russian'. Factory referred to this model as Model of 1874 or Cavalry Model. Chambered for .44 S&W Russian and .44 Henry rimfire cartridge. Barrel is 6.5' and round butt is the same humped-back affair as 2nd Model. Grips are walnut and finish blue or nickel plated. Most notable differences in appearance between this model and 2nd Model are shorter extractor housing under the barrel and integral front sight blade instead of pinned-on one found on previous models. In addition to S&W production for the commercial market and Russian military, the German firm of Ludwig and Lowe and the Russian Tula arsenal made copies of this gun for the Russian military. These and other variations impact values. Refer to Standard Catalog of Smith & Wesson available at GunDigestStore.com for details. Approximately 60,638 manufactured between 1874 and 1878. Variations include: Japanese Navy, anchor with 2 wavy lines marked – 10% premium; .44 Henry Rimfire. Turkish contract or commercial – 25% premium; Russian Contract Cyrillic marked - Made by S&W – 10% premium; Made by Ludwig & Loewe – 10% premium; Made by Tula Russian arsenal – 20% premium
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Model 3 Russian 3rd Model

.44 S&W Russian. Marked 'Russian Model' in English. Made 13,500.
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Model 3 Russian 3rd Model

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Model 3 Russian 3rd Model

5,000 made from altered centerfire frames. Made to fire .44 Henry rimfire. 'W' inspector's mark on butt. Fakes have been noted; be aware.
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Model 3 Russian 3rd Model

1,000 made. Has Japanese naval insignia, an anchor over two wavy lines, stamped on butt.
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Model 3 Russian 3rd Model

Barrel markings are in Russian Cyrillic. Approximately 41,100 produced.
Smith And Wesson Model 41 Serial Numbers
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Smith And Wesson 38 Special Serial Number Database

Model 3 Russian 3rd Model (Loewe & Tula Copies)

German firm of Ludwig Loewe produced a copy of this model that is nearly identical to the S&W. This German revolver was made under Russian contract, as well as for commercial sales. Contract model has different Cyrillic markings than S&W and letters 'HK' as inspector's marks. Commercial model has markings in English. Russian arsenal at Tula also produced a copy of this revolver with a different Cyrillic dated stamping on barrel.

Model 3 Russian 3rd Model (Loewe & Tula Copies)

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Model 3 Russian 3rd Model (Loewe & Tula Copies)

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Model 3 Schofield 1st Model

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Model 3 Schofield 1st Model

No 'US' markings, 35 made, Very Rare. NOTE: Use caution. UNABLE TO PRICE. At least double the military model values. Expert appraisal needed.

Second Model Schofield

Similar to the 1st Model Schofield with most noticeable differences being circles on each side of the frame-mounted latch, and serial number range. The vast majority were military issue, and are 'US' marked on butt. See comments on modified surplus guns and Wells Fargo Schofields at the listing for First Model Schofields above. In total, 646 Civilian Models were made, but despite their relative rarity they bring about the same value as the more common U.S.-issue Schofields. Serial range 3036-8969. Circa 1876-1877.
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Model 3 Schofield 2nd Model

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Model 3 Schofield 2nd Model

646 made.
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Schofield Surplus Models and Variations

Distributor modifications — After military use, many Schofields were sold as surplus and modified by distributers, who sometimes refinished the guns and shortened the barrel to 5”. These modified guns will bring less than guns in original configuration, perhaps 50% of what an original unaltered Schofield will bring.Wells Fargo — The famous Wells Fargo Express Company purchased a number of these shortened 5” barrel surplus Schofields and marked them on the ejector housing “W F & CO (or CO’S) EXP” along with the gun’s serial number. These “Wells Fargo Schofields” will bring close to the value of an original unaltered US Schofield. Beware of fake markings.San Francisco Police — Some Schofields are found with large 2- or 3-digit numbers stamped near the top of the backstrap. These have traditionally been “San Francisco Police” models, sent to California at the time of the Sandlot Riots. They will bring a slight premium.Civilian Models — See comments at 1st and 2nd Model Schofield listings above.
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Model 3 Schofield—Surplus Models

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Model 3 Schofield—Surplus Models

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The Victory Model Smith and Wesson .38 Caliber Revolver

Serial

The revolvers of the U.S. armed forces have always been under appreciated by collectors, the good news is that makes them relatively inexpensive to acquire, but this is changing. At a recent trip to the 2003 Louisville gun show I noticed prices on Victory revolvers had increased noticeably. That being said you might want to consider adding a few Victory models to your USGI collection.

While the information I provide below can be helpful please see the list on the bottom of this page for reference material you should have if you are going to collect these historical pieces . The Victory model revolvers participated in various roles from guard duty to riding in a shoulder holster with fighter and bomber pilots. I have talked to many ex-military personnel that carried them as late as the 1980s, as you can see these pistols played a significant part of our history. To this day the Victory model is a very enjoyable shooting collectible, mainly due to its inexpensive cost, light recoil, and good accuracy.
Enjoy and happy collecting, Ty

The Victory model was so named for the 'V' prefix which was placed before the serial number and represented 'Victory' against the Axis powers in World War II.

Serial numbers for the .38 special Victory model began at about V1 in early 1942 and ran until VS811119 with a date of late August of 1945 (end of production). V1 to approximately V39,999 were predominately .38 S&W Caliber (I have observed revolvers in the 1-40000 range in .38 special caliber). Serial numbers are located on Inside right grip, frame butt, Cylinder, extractor star, and bottom of barrel. Crane and crane recess are also serial numbered to each other, but this is a different number then the revolvers serial number as is correct for Victory model revolvers.

The Victory Revolver was produced during World War II, it is a variation of the Military & Police Model of 1905, fourth change and had the following characteristics between 1942 and 1945:

Model

Barrel: 2, 4, 5, or 6 inch. (4 inch common in .38 special, 5 inch common in 38/200 or .38 S&W)
Sights: Fixed
Finish: Early sandblast blue, sandblast mid-night black (appears grayish black). And finally a parkerized finish. Hammer and Trigger are case hardened.
Grips: Checkered walnut with medallion until early 1942, post February of 1942 they are smooth American Walnut with out medallions.

Smith Wesson Serial Numbers Manufacture Date

Ordnance acceptance marks:
The acceptance mark varies with the particulars of the order placed. With U.S. Navy orders you will find no acceptance marks on the original two contracts they placed. On later Navy revolvers, ordered through the Army they will be found with the more typical Army G.H.D. acceptance mark. Below you will find some of the common stamps with links to examples.

W.B. - The acceptance mark of Ordnance officer Waldemar Bromberg is located on the butt (to about serial number V145000). Just to the right of the acceptance mark (W.B.) is usually found an ordnance bomb and proof mark. The 'P' proof mark indicates this revolver has passed military proof testing. EXAMPLE – Click Here Sony wireless lan adapter uwa br100 driver.

G.H.D – From approximately 1942 to about May 1943 the acceptance mark of Ordnance officer Guy H. Drewry is found on the butt. From approximately V300000 to end of production G.H.D is found on the left top strap; EXAMPLE – Click Here

Property marks:
The most common property marks found on the Victory model are the UNITED STATES PROPERTY, US PROPERTY, and the US NAVY markings.

UNITED STATES PROPERTY – Found on left top strap to approximately V300000 and on the M&Ps pre Victory. Applied at the S&W factory. Example - Click Here

U.S. PROPERTY – The property mark was shortened to 'U.S. PROPERTY' at about serial number V300000. At this time the G.H.D acceptance mark was moved from the butt to the left top strap with the property mark. Applied at the S&W factory. EXAMPLE – Click Here

U.S. NAVY – Found on the revolvers left top strap as per the two Navy contracts. The Navy also applied a Property mark on the left side plate on some revolvers; these were filled in with red paint. This is not an S&W applied marking. EXAMPLE – Click Here and Here for the Navy applied mark.

Victory models have also been produced with out property marks, these revolvers were probably delivered by the U.S. Defense Supply Corporation (DSC) to defense contractors and public agencies that required them for guarding war sensitive materials.

Smith And Wesson Model 57 41 Magnum Serial Number Lookup

Other common markings:
S -
Revolvers that have the 'S' marking on the right side plate as well as before the serial number on the butt have the improved hammer block installed. If the 'S' in the serial number on the butt appears to be machine applied this would indicate it was produced with improved hammer block, and that it was not added later or it would have been hand stamped. The improved hammer block was put into production after an accidental discharge killed a sailor during World War II. This improved hammer block is still utilized in today's commercial Smith and Wesson revolvers. EXAMPLE – Click Here

P – Proof marking. This can very depending on the contract. Navy marked pistols usually have none. But C.W. Pates books indicate that some delivered under an Army contract could be found with a P mark. Post the V400,000 serial number range they are located on the underside of the barrel, back of the cylinder and left side plate. The later appear to be Army Supply Program contract revolvers. EXAMPLE – Click Here

Serial Numbers:
Serial numbers are located on the inside right grip, frame butt, Cylinder, extractor star, and bottom of grip. Serial numbers should be matching on all revolvers. Crane and Crane recess are also serial numbered to each other, but this is a different number then the revolvers serial number and is correct for Victory model revolvers.
Grip/Stock
EXAMPLE – Click Here
Barrel EXAMPLE – Click Here
Cylinder EXAMPLE – Click Here
Extractor Start EXAMPLE – Click Here
Butt EXAMPLE –
Click Here

Production:
38/200 British Service Revolver (S&W Caliber)
- There were over 571,629 of these models produced between October 1941 and May 1945 for the British Common wealth countries. These countries include the Union of South Africa (21,347), Canada (45,328), and Australia (8,000). The remaining 384,100 shipped between 1941 and the end of World War II were supplied by the U.S. Army Ordnance through the lend lease program to Britain for distribution.

Smith And Wesson Model 41 Serial Numbers By Year Chart

Victory model 38 Special – 352,000 shipped to the Army and Navy. Some of these were shipped to a commission responsible for supplying the civilian industries. They will usually have no property marks. Uses included guarding factories, ports, and federal/local government agencies.

Note: You can find all kinds of variations, with additional war and post war markings. These include rebuild markings, country ownership markings, unit markings, and much more. For a complete listing see the books referenced below.

Smith And Wesson Model 41 Serial Number Location

Recommended reading:
US Handguns of WW II - The Secondary Pistols and Revolvers by Charles W. Pate
Americas Right Arm - The S&W Military and Police Revolver by John Henwood
Smith and Wesson 1857 - 1945 by Robert J. Neal and Roy G. Jinks

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